Wind Science Activity with Japanese Vocabulary

 

tractor wind
Photo from Thumbwind.com

風が強い。 (かぜがつよい。)(kaze ga tsuyoi)

The phrase above means, “It’s windy” in Japanese. However, it literally translates as, “The wind is strong.” Which is definitely the case where I live in Michigan.

Huron County, the county I live in in Michigan, is home to the largest wind energy operation in Michigan. In fact, the “Thumb” area of Michigan is home to over 2,800 wind turbines. That’s a lot of turbines!

Today’s activity, Wind Around the Home, is brought to you by the nice folks over at Education.com. I’ve used their site often throughout the years to assist with home educating my kiddos, so when I was contacted by them to share an activity on the blog, I was happy to do so.

I’ve also included some Japanese vocabulary words to accompany the lesson, something I do often to tie in Japanese language learning into our daily lives and homeschool activities. Alright, let’s move on to the lesson.


 

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Wind Around the Home

Grade Levels: 4-6

Questions: On which side of the house would you put a windmill? Is there more wind at higher altitudes?

Possible Hypotheses: There is more wind on the south/north/east/west side of the house. There is more wind at ground level/at roof level.

Materials: Pencils with erasers Thumbtack Thread – 25 cm Paper Protractor Compass

Procedure:

1. Draw a diagram of your home. Be sure to draw the things around your home such as trees, shrubs, and other things that might block the wind. Label the north, east, west, and south sides of your home with the help of a compass or parent. Mark sites that represent the areas you will be testing.

2. Make a device to measure wind strength. Push the thumbtack into the eraser of a pencil and tie the thread around the thumbtack.

3. Measure the power of the wind using your device. Hold the device in the air and observe the wind blowing the thread. Record the angle of the thread. The larger the angle, the higher the wind energy at the location. Repeat the experiment several times at different times of the day and in weather.

4. Make a chart to record the time of day, the weather conditions, and the angle of the thread at each site.

Analysis and Conclusion: At what height was the wind strongest? Was this true at different times during the day? Where would you put a windmill around your house to provide the most energy? Is there only one good location or are several locations equally good?

 


JAPANESE VOCABULARY WORD LIST

Wind:  かぜ (風)kaze

Windmill:  かぜぐるま (風車)kazeguruma

North: きた (北) kita

South: みなみ (南) minami

East: ひがし (東)  higashi

West:  にし (西)nishi

Home: いえ (家) ie

Blow/blowing (VERB):  ふく (吹く)fuku

-Example sentence: The wind blows. かぜがふく。(風が吹く。)kaze ga fuku

-To learn how to conjugate the verb, fuku, click HERE.

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I hope you enjoyed the activity and learning some new Japanese vocabulary words!

Happy Learning,

Shiga Shar

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DuoLingo Japanese is Here!

pickachu dance

わーい!!!

Yay!!!

Duolingo Japanese is here! (iOS only for now)

If you’re not new to learning Japanese, there is an option to test your skills to determine your learning level. Every level has an option for testing out, actually.

I was able to test out of all of the hiragana levels and a few others, which made me feel pretty good about my learning progress so far. 🙂

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My Thoughts So Far

The Duolingo app is another free option for learning Japanese that’s worth giving a try. It has around 40 levels total, covering a wide variety of topics. So far, it’s okay. I’m a bit of a Memrise junkie, though, so that will most likely be my go-to learning application.

If you’ve never used Duolingo for learning, it does take a little getting used to. For example, sometimes words/phrases are introduced without an introduction. To figure out what they are, just tap the colored/underlined section and an explanation should pop up.

I’d never seen the phrase: といいます until I saw it today.  As you can see, it roughly means I am called/it is called/my name is/etc. So when introducing yourself you can say:

はじめまして,(your name)といいます。

hajimemashite,(your name), toiimasu.

Nice to meet you, my name is (your name).

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Have you tried it yet? What are your thoughts?

Thanks for reading!

Shiga Shar

If you enjoyed this post or learned something new, please share it on social media and consider donating a few bucks toward my 2017 Goodwill trip to Shiga through PayPal.

ありがとう // Arigatou // Thank you!

LET’S CONNECT AT THESE PLACES TOO  🙂

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Usagi’s Hiragana & Katakana Drag-n-Drop Game

usagi chan

Usgai’s Hiragana Drag-n-Drop Game is a simple way to quiz yourself on your hiragana knowledge. Simply click on the hiragana with your mouse and drag it into the correct sound space. There’s also a timer at the bottom of the game square, if you fancy that sort of thing.

I memorized hiragana and katakana using the Memrise app, but enjoyed using these on the side to help reinforce what I’ve learned.

Using multiple learning tools is a great way to strengthen your learning, and keeps you from getting a rut with just one study method or resource. 

There’s also a Katakana version HERE.

Technology Required: PC with Flash Player

Price: FREE

Language Level: Absolute Beginner

Link to the hiragana game here: http://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/sheaa/projects/genki/hiragana-timer.html

 

Thanks for reading!

Shiga Shar

If you enjoyed this post or learned something new, please share it on social media and consider donating a few bucks toward my 2017 Goodwill trip to Shiga through PayPal.

ありがとう // Arigatou // Thank you!

LET’S CONNECT AT THESE PLACES TOO  🙂

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How to Count to Five in Japanese & Two Free Worksheets

Count to Five

 

A few years ago I found these cool dry erase marker boards pictured above, and they are one of my favorite homeschool tools. They allow you to put traceable worksheets underneath a clear dry erase board to save you paper and make learning easier on the go. If you don’t have these boards, a simple plastic pocket page  works just as well.

Another fun way to use these worksheets is to simply print them up and use watercolors to trace the kanji. This is also a good small motor exercise for children. Of course, you can always just use markers or crayons if you’d like, too. And adults are free to use these too, I’m just sharing how I use them as a part of homeschooling my children.

How to Count to Five in Japanese 

Here’s quick phonetic run-down of the pronunciation of 1 through 5 in Japanese.

ONE: ichi (ee chee)

TWO: ni (knee

THREE: san (sahn)

FOUR: yon (yone)

FIVE: go (go)

For the worksheets, just click and it will open up a .pdf for you to print and save. If you have any problems or questions, feel free to post them in the comments section.

1-5 number writing practice sheet

kanji 1-5

Thanks for reading,

Shiga Shar

If you enjoyed this post or learned something new, please share it on social media and consider donating a few bucks toward my 2017 Goodwill trip to Shiga through PayPal. Arigato/Thank you!